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Albert Nekrasov
Albert Nekrasov

EVENT PLANNER __HOT__


Meeting, convention, and event planners work in their offices and onsite at hotels or conference centers. They often travel to attend events and visit meeting sites. During meetings or conventions, planners may work many more hours than usual.




EVENT PLANNER


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About 16,600 openings for meeting, convention, and event planners are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.


Meeting, convention, and event planners search for potential meeting sites, such as hotels and convention centers. They consider the lodging and services that the facility can provide, how easy it will be for people to get there, and the attractions that the surrounding area has to offer.


Meeting planners plan large meetings for organizations. Healthcare meeting planners specialize in organizing meetings and conferences for healthcare professionals. Corporate planners organize internal business meetings and meetings between businesses. These events may be in person or online and held either within corporate facilities or offsite to include more people.


Event planners arrange the details of a variety of events. Wedding planners are the most well known, but event planners also coordinate celebrations such as anniversaries, reunions, and other large social events, as well as corporate events, including product launches, galas, and award ceremonies. Nonprofit event planners plan large events with the goal of raising donations for a charity or advocacy organization. Events may include banquets, charity races, and food drives.


Meeting, convention, and event planners spend time in their offices and at event locations, such as hotels and convention centers. They may travel regularly to attend the events they organize and to visit meeting sites.


The work of meeting, convention, and event planners can be fast paced and demanding. Planners oversee many aspects of an event at the same time and face numerous deadlines, and they may coordinate multiple meetings or events at the same time.


Most meeting, convention, and event planners work full time, and many work more than 40 hours per week. They often work additional hours to finalize preparations as major events approach. During meetings or conventions, planners may work on weekends.


Planners who have studied meeting and event management or hospitality management may start out with greater responsibilities than do those from other academic disciplines. Some colleges offer continuing education courses in meeting and event planning.


The Society of Government Meeting Professionals offers the Certified Government Meeting Professional (CGMP) designation for meeting planners who work for, or contract with, federal, state, or local government. This certification is helpful for candidates who want to show that they know government purchasing policies and travel regulations. To qualify, candidates must have worked as a meeting planner for at least 1 year and have been a member of SGMP for 6 months. To become a certified planner, members must take a 3-day course and pass an exam.


The International Association of Exhibitions and Events offers the Certified in Exhibition Management (CEM) designation, which demonstrates meeting professional standards for exhibitions and events management. Candidates obtain this credential by completing nine courses.


Meeting, convention, and event planners may benefit from having some experience in meeting and event planning. Working in a variety of positions at hotels, convention centers, and convention bureaus provides knowledge of how the hospitality industry operates. Other beneficial work experiences include coordinating university or volunteer events and shadowing professionals.


Communication skills. Meeting, convention, and event planners exchange information with clients, suppliers, and event staff. They must have excellent written and oral communication skills to express the needs of their clients.


The median annual wage for meeting, convention, and event planners was $49,470 in May 2021. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $30,170, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $96,230.


Event planners' services are expected to be in demand by people who want help organizing personal events, such as weddings. In addition, demand for professionally planned meetings and events will stem from businesses and organizations that host events. However, virtual meeting technology may dampen employment growth as virtual meetings continue to replace some in-person events.


Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Meeting, Convention, and Event Planners, at -and-financial/meeting-convention-and-event-planners.htm (visited March 16, 2023).


Not to be confused with a wedding planner, an event planner (also known as a meeting and/or convention planner) is someone who coordinates all aspects of professional meetings and events. They often choose meeting locations, arrange transportation, and coordinate many other details.


Whether it is an educational conference or business convention, meetings and events bring people together for a common purpose. Meeting, convention, and event planners work to ensure that this purpose is achieved seamlessly.


Event planners also search for potential meeting sites, such as hotels and convention centres. They consider the lodging and services that the facility can provide, how easy it will be for people to get there, and the attractions that the surrounding area has to offer. More recently, planners also consider whether an online meeting can achieve the same objectives as a face-to-face meeting.


Once a location is selected, planners arrange meeting space and support services. For example, they negotiate contracts with suppliers to provide meals for attendees and coordinate plans with on-site staff. They organize speakers, entertainment, and activities. They also oversee the finances of meetings and conventions. On the day of the event, planners may register attendees, coordinate transportation, and make sure meeting rooms are set up properly.


Event planners spend most of their time in offices. During meetings and events, they usually work on-site at hotels or convention centers. They travel regularly to attend events they organize and to visit prospective meeting sites, sometimes in exotic locations around the world. Planners regularly collaborate with clients, hospitality workers, and meeting attendees.


The work of meeting, convention, and event planners can be fast-paced and demanding. Planners oversee many aspects of the event at the same time, face numerous deadlines, and orchestrate the activities of several different groups of people.


Most meeting, convention, and event planners work full time. In addition, many are required to work long, irregular hours in the time leading up to a major event. During meetings or conventions, planners may work very long days, starting early in the morning and working late into the evening. Sometimes, they must work on weekends.


Based on our pool of users, Event Planners tend to be predominately artistic people. This finding is not surprising. Essentially, there is an art to almost everything that event planners are asked to do: liaise with clients; negotiate contracts; work with suppliers, who may be from different cultural backgrounds and have different work ethics; be simultaneously aware and responsive, yet able to fade into the background; and in the face of inevitable glitches, remain composed under pressure.


The first thing that anyone considering this career should know is that event planning is consistently listed as one of the top ten most stressful jobs. While the profession can involve travel to exciting destinations and opportunities to stay at often high-end hotels and dine at exclusive restaurants, the work is fraught with immovable deadlines and pressure situations that demand quick thinking and resolution.


Excellent verbal and written communication skillsEvent planners are the liaison between multiple parties, from clients to venues to local vendors. This means that they must be able to respond to a variety of requests of needs.


FlexibilityIn event planning, change is relatively constant. Delayed flights mean delayed attendees. The client changes his or her mind onsite. Weather necessitates that an outdoor event be moved indoors. At some level, the job of an event planner is to foresee the unforeseen and be prepared to handle it.


In conclusion, if you are looking for a 9 to 5 job, event planning is not for you. Part of the job spec may include 18-hour days (both in the days leading up to an event and during the event itself), falling into bed at 2:00 a.m. after overseeing an awards dinner, or rising at 5:00 a.m. to help set up a conference or exhibit.


This Event Planner job description template is optimized for posting on online job boards or careers pages and easy to customize. Feel free to modify this job description to meet the needs of your company, whether you're hiring for an event planner, coordinator, or manager.


We are looking for a successful and enthusiastic Event Planner to produce events from conception through to completion. Event Coordinator responsibilities include providing outstanding customer service and organizing memorable events that meet quality expectations. 041b061a72


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